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Two weeks ago, an anniversary celebration was held at the Fife ’n Drum in Kent, where great food, drinks, and music has been served to locals and visitors for 45 years.
ART CRITIC
Amphorae
The artist’s reverence for history and the simplicity and elegance of ancient objects inspires Peter Busby, but it is his command of his materials that enables him. 
Coaching Corner
INBOX

Dear Coach,
I seem to have fallen into an unhealthy relationship with my smartphone, and yet I can’t seem to lift myself out of it. 

It begins early in the morning when my phone (which is also my alarm clock) is the first thing I reach for. I check my texts and emails, peak at my social media feeds, check the weather, peruse the morning headlines, then revisit my emails and texts one more time. All of this before I even get out of bed!

Throughout the day, it only gets worse. Almost everything I do and everyone I interact with somehow involves a gadget. It all feels speedy and superficial, beyond my control and increasingly wrong.

Occasionally I feel tempted to slam the thing against a wall and shatter it, just to see how I’d fare, but even the thought makes me shudder. How would I even function? I am looking for a more reasonable approach to weaning myself from this dependency, while still operating as a full-fledged member of modern society.

Can you help?

Sincerely,
Hooked 

REPLY

Dear Hooked,
Thank you for articulating the question on so many minds.

Almost everyone I know feels somewhat shackled and burdened by their technology, and I am currently coaching a number of clients seeking to curb pesky tech habits. One wants to feel more present with his children, and one has noticed headaches and nausea after too much device time. One feels perpetually scatter-brained and distracted, bouncing from one task to the next without her former ability to focus. Still, another suffers from “compare and despair” syndrome after spending too much time on Facebook or Instagram.

All of them tell me they feel exhausted, pulled in too many directions and, when it comes down to it, just plain sad and lonely.

Welcome to the age of technology!

Before you go shattering your devices, let’s focus a bit on the positive, shall we?

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